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File #: Int 1557-2019    Version: Name: Five-year plans for city streets, sidewalks, and pedestrian spaces.
Type: Introduction Status: Enacted
Committee: Committee on Transportation
On agenda: 5/29/2019
Enactment date: 11/19/2019 Law number: 2019/195
Title: A Local Law to amend the administrative code of the city of New York, in relation to five-year plans for city streets, sidewalks, and pedestrian spaces
Sponsors: Corey D. Johnson, Carlina Rivera , Ydanis A. Rodriguez, Mark Levine, Antonio Reynoso, Costa G. Constantinides, Helen K. Rosenthal, Laurie A. Cumbo, Keith Powers , Margaret S. Chin, Mark Treyger, Brad S. Lander, James G. Van Bramer, Donovan J. Richards, Andrew Cohen, Daniel Dromm , Ben Kallos, Rafael Salamanca, Jr., Stephen T. Levin, Robert E. Cornegy, Jr., Alicka Ampry-Samuel , Carlos Menchaca, Fernando Cabrera , Rafael L. Espinal, Jr., Deborah L. Rose, Diana Ayala , The Public Advocate (Mr. Williams)
Council Member Sponsors: 27
Summary: This bill would require the Department of Transportation (“DOT”) to issue and implement a transportation master plan every five years. The plan’s goals would be to prioritize the safety of all street users, the use of mass transit, the reduction of vehicle emissions, and access for individuals with disabilities. Each plan would include certain benchmarks. The first plan would be due in December of 2021 and would include: • 150 miles of physically or camera-protected bus lanes over five years, with at least 20 miles in the first year and at least 30 miles during each subsequent year; • Transit signal priority at 750 intersections during the first year and 1,000 intersections during each subsequent year; • 250 miles of protected bike lanes over five years, with at least 30 miles in the first year and 50 miles in each subsequent year; • Bus stop upgrades like benches, shelters, and real-time passenger information at 500 bus stops each year; • Redesigning at least 2,000 signalized intersections over five years, with at least 400 redesigns each year; • Accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections, with at least 500 installations each year; • Assessing and amending commercial loading zones and truck routes; • Developing parking policies to promote the master plan’s goals of safety, mass transit use, reduced vehicle emissions, and access for individuals with disabilities; and • Within the first two years, create and maintain one million square feet of pedestrian space. The following master plan, due in 2026, would include the completion of a connected bike lane network, installation of physically or camera-protected bus lanes on all routes where they can be installed, installation of accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections over five years, installation of bus stop upgrades at all bus stops, redesign at least 2,000 intersections over five years, and installation of pedestrian ramps at no fewer than 3,000 street corners. The bill also requires reporting in February of each year regarding an update on any changes to the master plan and the progress towards achieving the benchmarks laid out in the plan. Finally, DOT would be required to conduct a public education campaign on the benefits of each master plan.
Indexes: Report Required
Attachments: 1. Summary of Int. No. 1557-A, 2. Summary of Int. No. 1557, 3. Int. No. 1557, 4. May 29, 2019 - Stated Meeting Agenda with Links to Files, 5. Hearing Transcript - Stated Meeting 5-29-19, 6. Minutes of the Stated Meeting - May 29, 2019, 7. Minutes of the Recessed Meeting of May 29, 2019 Held on June 13, 2019, 8. Committee Report 6/12/19, 9. Hearing Testimony 6/12/19, 10. Hearing Transcript 6/12/19, 11. Proposed Int. No. 1557-A - 10/28/19, 12. Committee Report 10/29/19, 13. Hearing Transcript 10/29/19, 14. October 30, 2019 - Stated Meeting Agenda with Links to Files, 15. Hearing Transcript - Stated Meeting 10-30-19, 16. Int. No. 1557-A (FINAL), 17. Fiscal Impact Statement, 18. Mayor's Letter
Date Ver.Prime SponsorAction ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsMultimedia
11/19/2019ACorey D. Johnson City Council Recved from Mayor by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
11/19/2019ACorey D. Johnson Mayor Signed Into Law by Mayor  Action details Meeting details Not available
11/19/2019ACorey D. Johnson Mayor Hearing Held by Mayor  Action details Meeting details Not available
10/30/2019ACorey D. Johnson City Council Sent to Mayor by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
10/30/2019ACorey D. Johnson City Council Approved by CouncilPass Action details Meeting details Not available
10/29/2019*Corey D. Johnson Committee on Transportation Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
10/29/2019*Corey D. Johnson Committee on Transportation Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Meeting details Not available
10/29/2019*Corey D. Johnson Committee on Transportation Amended by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
10/29/2019ACorey D. Johnson Committee on Transportation Approved by CommitteePass Action details Meeting details Not available
6/12/2019*Corey D. Johnson Committee on Transportation Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
6/12/2019*Corey D. Johnson Committee on Transportation Laid Over by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
5/29/2019*Corey D. Johnson City Council Referred to Comm by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
5/29/2019*Corey D. Johnson City Council Introduced by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available

Int. No. 1557-A

 

By The Speaker (Council Member Johnson) and Council Members Rivera, Rodriguez, Levine, Reynoso, Constantinides, Rosenthal, Cumbo, Powers, Chin, Treyger, Lander, Van Bramer, Richards, Cohen, Dromm, Kallos, Salamanca, Levin, Cornegy, Ampry-Samuel, Menchaca, Cabrera, Espinal, Rose, Ayala and the Public Advocate (Mr. Williams)

 

A Local Law to amend the administrative code of the city of New York, in relation to five-year plans for city streets, sidewalks, and pedestrian spaces

 

Be it enacted by the Council as follows:

 

Section 1. Subchapter 3 of chapter 1 of title 19 of the administrative code of the city of New York is amended by adding a new section 19-199.1 to read as follows:

§ 19-199.1 Master plan. a. Definitions. For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the following meanings:

Accessible pedestrian signal. The term “accessible pedestrian signal” means a device that communicates information about pedestrian signal timing in a nonvisual format.

Bicycle network. The term “bicycle network” means a contiguous network of protected bicycle lanes, designated bicycle paths on bridges, off-street bicycle paths or trails, and shared streets. A bicycle network shall be connected by intersections with mixing zones, fully split phases, delayed turns, offset crossing designs, or similar street treatments designed to improve safety and reduce conflicts for all street users at intersections.

Bicycle network connectivity index. The term “bicycle network connectivity index” means a figure measuring the extent and completeness of the bicycle network, based on the number of choices a cyclist has for turning from one bicycle route onto another, without leaving the overall network.

Bicycle lane network coverage index. The term “bicycle lane network coverage index” means a numeric figure representing the percentage of residents of the city who reside within one mile of the bicycle lane network.

Bus stop upgrades. The term “bus stop upgrades” means the addition to a bus stop of a bus shelter or bench and sign equipped with a system that conveys arrival times or other passenger information in real time.

Pedestrian space. The term “pedestrian space” means an area for pedestrian circulation, use, or enjoyment including, but not limited to, pedestrian plazas, curb extensions, sidewalks, safety islands, shared streets, and triangles, and which may contain amenities such as tables, seating, trees, plants, lighting, bike racks, or public art.  

Protected bicycle lane. The term “protected bicycle lane” means a portion of a street or intersection that is designated for the exclusive use of bicycles and that is separated from motorized vehicle traffic by physical barriers, or is an off-road or raised pathway.

Protected bus lane. The term “protected bus lane” means a bus lane that is protected by physical barriers or is monitored by stationary or mobile bus lane photo devices that automatically produce an image of any vehicle that violates a bus lane restriction at the time of such violation.

Shared street. The term “shared street” means a street designated by the department as such with recommended speed limits of five miles per hour and that allows use by motor vehicles, pedestrians, and individuals using bicycles.

Transit signal priority. The term “transit signal priority” means technology capable of facilitating bus movements through intersections controlled by traffic signals.

b. Master plan. 1. The department shall issue and implement a master plan for the use of streets, sidewalks, and pedestrian spaces every five years. In developing each such plan, the department shall prioritize and promote: (i) the safety of all street users; (ii) on-street priority for mass transit vehicles; (iii) the reduction of vehicle emissions; and (iv) access for individuals with disabilities.

2. By December 1, 2021 and by December 1 of every fifth year thereafter, the department shall issue such plan for the five-year period beginning January 1 of the following year.

c. Benchmarks. 1. Each master plan issued pursuant to subdivision b of this section shall include proposals for street redesigns, protected bus lanes, protected bicycle lanes, bicycle parking, pedestrian spaces, commercial loading zones, truck routes, and parking, including the identification of specific routes, locations, or areas of the city for such proposals. In addition, each such master plan shall include benchmarks regarding such proposals that shall be achieved no later than December 31 of the final year of such plan.

2. The master plan due by December 1, 2021, shall include, at a minimum, the following benchmarks:

(i) install at least 150 miles of protected bus lanes, in coordination with the metropolitan transportation authority, with such lanes located along a median where feasible, with at least 20 miles of such lanes installed during the first year of such plan and at least 30 miles installed during each subsequent year of such plan;

(ii) implement transit signal priority in at least 750 intersections along bus routes during the first year of such plan and at least 1,000 intersections during each subsequent year of such plan or until transit signal priority is implemented in every intersection where such installation is feasible along every bus route where buses capable of utilizing transit signal priority are operated;

(iii) install at least 250 miles of protected bicycle lanes, with at least 30 miles of such lanes installed during the first year of such plan and at least 50 miles installed during each subsequent year of such plan;

(iv) implement bus stop upgrades at no fewer than 500 bus stops serving buses operated by the metropolitan transportation authority during each such year of such plan;

(v) redesign at least 2,000 intersections with a pedestrian signal pursuant to the checklist required by section 19-182.2, with at least 400 such intersections redesigned during each year of such plan;

(vi) install accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections, with installation of such signals at no fewer than 500 intersections during each year of such plan;

(vii) assess and amend commercial loading zones, truck routes, and related areas to support freight movement and curb access citywide;

(viii) develop parking policies to prioritize and promote: (1) safety of all street users; (2) on-street priority of mass transit vehicles; (3) reduction of vehicle emissions; and (4) access to streets, sidewalks, public spaces, and mass transit for individuals with disabilities; and

(ix) no later than December 31, 2023, create and maintain no less than 1,000,000 square feet of pedestrian space.

3. The master plan due no later than December 1, 2026, shall include the following benchmarks:

(i) complete a connected bicycle network and ensure a bicycle lane network coverage index of 100 percent;

(ii) install protected bus lanes on all bus routes where such improvements can be installed;

(iii) install accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections, with installation of such signals at no fewer than 500 intersections during each year of such plan;

(iv) implement bus stop upgrades at all bus stops serving buses operated by the metropolitan transportation authority where such upgrades are feasible; and

(v) redesign at least 2,000 intersections with a pedestrian signal pursuant to the checklist required by section 19-182.2, with at least 400 such intersections redesigned during each year of such plan; and

(vi) install or upgrade pedestrian ramps at no fewer than 3,000 intersection corners.

d. Reporting. 1. By December 1, 2021 and by December 1 of every fifth year thereafter, the department shall submit such plan to the mayor and the speaker of the council, and post such plan on the department’s website.

2. By February 1, 2023 and by each February 1 thereafter, the department shall submit to the mayor and the speaker of the council and post on the department’s website an update regarding any changes to the plan from the previous year, the bicycle lane network coverage index, and the status of the implementation of each benchmark identified in such plan, including but not limited to those benchmarks listed in subdivision c. Such information shall include a data set containing data on geographic feature boundaries, as represented by points, lines, or polygons. In addition, each report due beginning February 1, 2028 shall include the bicycle connectivity index for the previous year.

e. Public education campaign. The department shall conduct a public education campaign regarding the benefits of each master plan, including, but not limited to, the impacts on safety, the environment, accessibility, mobility, and the city’s economy.

§ 2. This local law takes effect immediately.

 

LS 10165

10/22/19 11:30PM