New York City Council Header
File #: Res 0610-2015    Version: * Name: Granting NYC the authority to set its own minimum wage.
Type: Resolution Status: Adopted
Committee: Committee on Civil Service and Labor
On agenda: 3/11/2015
Enactment date: Law number:
Title: Resolution calling upon the New York State Legislature to pass, and the Governor to sign, legislation granting New York City the authority to set its own minimum wage.
Sponsors: Melissa Mark-Viverito, Daniel Dromm , I. Daneek Miller, Ben Kallos, Stephen T. Levin, Corey D. Johnson, Jumaane D. Williams, Mark Levine, Maria Del Carmen Arroyo, Margaret S. Chin, Costa G. Constantinides, Vanessa L. Gibson, Brad S. Lander, Annabel Palma, Donovan J. Richards, Deborah L. Rose, Karen Koslowitz, Helen K. Rosenthal, Carlos Menchaca, Elizabeth S. Crowley, Ydanis A. Rodriguez, James G. Van Bramer, Robert E. Cornegy, Jr., Mathieu Eugene
Council Member Sponsors: 24
Attachments: 1. March 11, 2015 - Stated Meeting Agenda with Links to Files, 2. Committee Report 4/20/15, 3. Hearing Testimony 4/20/15, 4. Hearing Transcript 4/20/15, 5. Committee Report 4/24/15, 6. Hearing Transcript 4/24/15, 7. April 28, 2015 - Stated Meeting Agenda with Links to Files, 8. Hearing Transcript - Stated Meeting 4-28-15, 9. Minutes of the Stated Meeting - April 28, 2015
Date Ver.Prime SponsorAction ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsMultimedia
4/28/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito City Council Approved, by CouncilPass Action details Meeting details Not available
4/24/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito Committee on Civil Service and Labor Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/24/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito Committee on Civil Service and Labor Approved by CommitteePass Action details Meeting details Not available
4/20/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito Committee on Women's Issues Laid Over by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/20/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito Committee on Women's Issues Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/20/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito Committee on Civil Service and Labor Laid Over by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/20/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito Committee on Civil Service and Labor Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
3/11/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito City Council Referred to Comm by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
3/11/2015*Melissa Mark-Viverito City Council Introduced by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
Res. No. 610
 
 
Resolution calling upon the New York State Legislature to pass, and the Governor to sign, legislation granting New York City the authority to set its own minimum wage.
 
 
By The Speaker (Council Member Mark-Viverito) and Council Members Dromm, Miller, Kallos, Levin, Johnson, Williams, Levine, Arroyo, Chin, Constantinides, Gibson, Lander, Palma, Richards, Rose, Koslowitz, Rosenthal, Menchaca, Crowley, Rodriguez, Van Bramer, Cornegy and Eugene
 
Whereas, The most recently available data from the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity indicates that based on the New York City poverty threshold, poverty rates increased from 19.0 percent in 2008 to 21.4 percent in 2012; and
Whereas, New York City is the 16th most expensive city in the world to live in and the most expensive city in the United States, according to a 2014 study by Mercer, a global consulting company; and
Whereas, According to a 2014 National Employment Law Project ("NELP") report, An Unbalanced Recovery: Real Wage and Job Growth Trends, recent job growth in New York City has primarily been concentrated in low wage industries such as fast food; and
Whereas, Indeed, according to a 2013 NELP study, Super-Sizing Public Costs: How Low Wages at Top Fast-Food Chains Leave Taxpayers Footing the Bill, the majority of jobs in the fast-food industry are low wage; and
Whereas, The same 2013 NELP study estimates that 52 percent of workers in the fast-food industry rely on at least one public assistance program; and
Whereas, According to the Fiscal Policy Institute, workers of color and women are more likely to earn low wages; and
Whereas, Given the high cost of living, New York City workers need a higher minimum wage in order to keep pace with other workers around the country; and
Whereas, A higher minimum wage could help address the serious income inequality that exists in New York City; and
Whereas, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo recognized New York City's unique position by recently proposing a separate minimum wage for the City; and
Whereas, According to a 2013 NELP study an average family in New York City would need to earn $15 to $16 per hour to be "self-sufficient;" and
Whereas, The federal government last raised the minimum wage to $7.25 per hour in 2007; and
Whereas, The New York State minimum wage is presently $8.75 per hour and is scheduled to increase to $9.00 per hour at the end of 2015; and
Whereas, As of February 2015, California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington State have a minimum wage greater than $9 per hour; and
Whereas, Albuquerque, New Mexico; Bernalillo County, New Mexico; Montgomery County, Maryland; Prince George's County, Maryland; San Francisco, California; San Jose, California; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Santa Fe County, New Mexico; Seattle, Washington, and Washington DC, have each adopted a local minimum wage; and
Whereas, Seattle's minimum wage is currently $9.47 per hour and will rise to $15 per hour by 2021; and
Whereas, San Francisco's minimum wage is $11.05 per hour, and will also rise to $15 per hour by July, 2018; and
Whereas, According to a joint 2014 NELP and Fiscal Policy Institute study, Why New York State Should Let Cities and Counties Enact Higher Local Minimum Wages, local increases in minimum wage results in "significantly improved job and living conditions for workers and families at the bottom of their economies;" and
Whereas, Furthermore, according to the United States Department of Labor, increasing the minimum wage spurs small business development, greater consumer spending and sustained economic growth; and
Whereas, Authorizing New York City to establish its own minimum wage will result in a minimum wage that correlates to the City's high cost of living and better reflects the reality of living in New York City; now, therefore, be it
      Resolved, That the Council of the City of New York calls upon the New York State Legislature to pass, and the Governor to sign, legislation granting New York City the authority to set its own minimum wage.
 
 
GZ
LS 4455.2
03/10/15