New York City Council Header
File #: Res 0589-2010    Version: * Name: Department of Health and Human Services to fully fund the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.
Type: Resolution Status: Filed
Committee: Committee on Health
On agenda: 11/30/2010
Enactment date: Law number:
Title: Resolution calling upon the United States Department of Health and Human Services to fully fund the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to allow provider and care networks to continue to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic in New York City and across the nation.
Sponsors: Albert Vann, Gale A. Brewer, Margaret S. Chin, Leroy G. Comrie, Jr., Daniel Dromm , Julissa Ferreras-Copeland, Lewis A. Fidler, Letitia James, G. Oliver Koppell, Karen Koslowitz, Brad S. Lander, Melissa Mark-Viverito, Darlene Mealy, Domenic M. Recchia, Jr., Diana Reyna, Deborah L. Rose, James G. Van Bramer, Jumaane D. Williams, Ydanis A. Rodriguez, Michael C. Nelson, Peter A. Koo
Council Member Sponsors: 21
Res. No. 589
 
 
Resolution calling upon the United States Department of Health and Human Services to fully fund the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to allow provider and care networks to continue to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic in New York City and across the nation.
 
 
By Council Members Vann, Brewer, Chin, Comrie, Dromm, Ferreras, Fidler, James, Koppell, Koslowitz, Lander, Mark-Viverito, Mealy, Recchia, Reyna, Rose, Van Bramer, Williams, Rodriguez, Nelson and Koo
 
Whereas, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that nearly 56,300 individuals were infected with HIV throughout the United States in 2006 and that more than 1,106,400 people were living with HIV; and
Whereas, According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), New York City is the epicenter of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, with more than 100,000 New Yorkers living with HIV, and approximately one-fourth of such individuals do not know that they are infected; and
Whereas, DOHMH indicated that New York City has the highest AIDS case rate in the country, with more cases than Los Angeles, San Francisco, Miami and Washington, D.C. combined; and  
Whereas, HIV/AIDS is a significant public health problem with major disparities among races, and DOHMH estimates that African Americans and Hispanics make up 80 percent of new AIDS diagnoses and deaths; and
Whereas, Funding is central to combating HIV/AIDS, particularly in providing care, treatment and services for individuals who suffer from this illness; and
Whereas, According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services' Health Resources and Services Administration, the Ryan White Program works with cities, states, and local community-based organizations to provide HIV-related services to more than half a million people annually; and
Whereas, The Ryan White Program was designed for those individuals who do not have sufficient health care coverage or financial resources to combat their HIV diagnoses; and
Whereas, The program is named for Ryan White, a young man who was diagnosed with AIDS at the age of 13; and
Whereas, Ryan and his mother, Jeanne White Ginder, were pioneers as they battled for Ryan's right to attend school and spoke out and raised awareness about HIV/AIDS; and
Whereas, While Ryan lost his battle to the disease at the age of 18, his legacy lives on and individuals are receiving a higher level of care and treatment; and
Whereas, Shortly after his death, Congress passed the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act in 1990, and this legislation has been renewed in 1996, 2000, 2006 and most recently in 2009, now known as the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program; and
Whereas, New York City is a recipient of Ryan White funding, particularly Part A and Minority AIDS Initiative funding; and
Whereas, The purpose of these funding streams is to provide support services to improve the health status of uninsured and underinsured individuals living with HIV across the city; and
Whereas, Advocates have expressed concerns due to recent changes to the Ryan White Program, particularly the emphasis on direct medical care, which they allege is at the expense of other vital and core services; and
Whereas, New York State is also a recipient of Ryan White Part B funding which was intended to be used to promote a coordinated community response that results in improved access to care and supportive services for those infected with HIV/AIDS; and
Whereas, Funding constraints are forcing provider networks to close and leaving these systems unable to achieve their mission; and  
Whereas, Given the public health impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, it is egregious that funding is being reduced and restricted, especially since these funding reductions can result in unintended consequences including an increase in the number of new cases of HIV/AIDS and a decrease in the number of people that would receive the vital services that they so desperately need; now, therefore, be it
      Resolved, That the Council of the City of New York calls upon the United States Department of Health and Human Services to fully fund the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to allow provider and care networks to continue to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic in New York City and across the nation.
JM
LS # 1650
11/5/10