New York City Council Header
File #: Res 2169-2009    Version: * Name: Authorizes homeowners and not-for-profit agencies in NYC to receive an abatement of real property taxes up to $2000 for the cost of installing sewer improvement check valve devices on certain dwellings. (A.1255/S.1735)
Type: Resolution Status: Filed
Committee: Committee on Finance
On agenda: 9/17/2009
Enactment date: Law number:
Title: Resolution calling upon the New York State Legislature to pass and the Governor to sign A.1255/S.1735, which authorizes homeowners and not-for-profit agencies in New York City to receive an abatement of real property taxes up to two thousand dollars for the cost of installing sewer improvement check valve devices on certain dwellings.
Sponsors: James F. Gennaro, Charles Barron, Gale A. Brewer, Leroy G. Comrie, Jr., Lewis A. Fidler, Vincent J. Gentile, Letitia James, Annabel Palma, James Sanders, Jr., Larry B. Seabrook, Kendall Stewart, David I. Weprin, Alan J. Gerson, Michael C. Nelson, Rosie Mendez
Council Member Sponsors: 15

Res. No. 2169

Resolution calling upon the New York State Legislature to pass and the Governor to sign A.1255/S.1735, which authorizes homeowners and not-for-profit agencies in New York City to receive an abatement of real property taxes up to two thousand dollars for the cost of installing sewer improvement check valve devices on certain dwellings.

 

By Council Members Gennaro, Barron, Brewer, Comrie, Fidler, Gentile, James, Palma, Sanders Jr., Seabrook, Stewart, Weprin, Gerson, Nelson and Mendez

 

Whereas, Backflow is the undesirable reversal of flow of non-potable water (industrial wastewater, rainwater, and street runoff) through a cross connection and into the piping of a public water system or a consumer’s potable (drinking) water system; and

Whereas, Backflow occurs when pollutants or contaminants enter into the safe

drinking water system through an uncontrolled cross connection; and                     

Whereas, A cross connection exists whenever the drinking water system is, or could be, connected to any non-potable source (i.e. plumbing fixture, or any equipment used in a plumbing system); and

Whereas, To control these cross-connections and prevent backflow, a sewer improvement check valve, or “backflow device”, must be installed at the point of the cross connection; and

                     Whereas, Approximately 70% of the City’s sewers  operate on a combined sewer system, where potable and non-potable water are collected in the same sewers and then conveyed together to the City’s treatment plants; and

                     Whereas, During periods of heavy rain and snow, when the groundwater is high, and the capacity of the system is exceeded,  combined sewers fill to capacity and are unable to carry the combined potable and non-potable water to the plants; and

Whereas, If the water cannot flow to the plants, then the mix of storm water and untreated water may flow through residential sink drains, and flood drains on lower levels, such as basements; and

                     Whereas, On July 18, 2007 and August 8, 2007,  New York City experienced such extreme flooding caused by torrential rain that the Federal Emergency Management Agency deemed many homeowners and not-for-profit groups, who suffered major property damage, eligible for “disaster” assistance; and

Whereas, Backflow devices allow water to flow away from the sinks, drains, and basements of homeowners and not-for-profit groups, thereby preventing sewage from backing up into their basement and sink drains; and

Whereas, Such devices will help prevent homeowners and not-for-profit groups from enduring severe financial hardship from property damage and cleaning expenses due to backflow; and

Whereas, The high cost of backflow devices, which can range from $1,400 to $3,000 in New York City, may deter homeowners and not-for-profit groups from purchasing and installing the device; and

Whereas, Allowing homeowners and not-for-profit groups to receive a property tax abatement of up to 50% of the cost to install a backflow device (up to $2,000) will allow them to take a proactive measure to protect their property against flooding; and

                     Whereas, Until the City makes the massive  infrastructure improvements necessary to solve this problem, homeowners and not-for-profit groups can prevent raw sewage  backflow  by installing a sewer line check valve; and

                     Whereas,  A tax abatement is necessary to make the check valve affordable; and

                     Whereas, In the 2009 New York State legislative session, the State Legislature introduced A.1255/S.1735; and

                     Whereas, These bills would amend the Real Property Tax law to provide homeowners and nonprofit institutions in  New York  City  with an abatement equal to fifty percent (up to two thousand dollars) towards the cost of installing a  sewer  line  check  valve  to prevent  sewage  backflow; and

                     Whereas, For homeowners the abatement will be a credit against their property tax, while for nonprofit organizations the abatement will be a credit against their sewer and water bill; now, therefore be it

                     RESOLVED, That the Council of the City of New York calls upon the New York State Legislature to pass and the Governor to sign A.1255/S.1735, which authorizes homeowners and not-for-profit agencies in New York City to receive an abatement of real property taxes up to two thousand dollars for the cost of installing sewer improvement check valve devices on certain dwellings.

 

 

TE

LS 7567

8-14-09