New York City Council Header
File #: Res 0169-2004    Version: * Name: Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, March
Type: Resolution Status: Filed
Committee: Committee on Health
On agenda: 2/26/2004
Enactment date: Law number:
Title: Resolution recognizing March as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and calling upon the appropriate committee of the Council to hold a hearing regarding this disease and its prevention.
Sponsors: Bill Perkins, Tracy L. Boyland, Lewis A. Fidler, Miguel Martinez, Michael C. Nelson, Alan J. Gerson
Council Member Sponsors: 6

Res. No. 169

 

Resolution recognizing March as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and calling upon the appropriate committee of the Council to hold a hearing regarding this disease and its prevention.  

 

By Council Members Perkins, Boyland, Fidler, Martinez, Nelson and Gerson

 

Whereas, Colorectal cancer is a disease in which the cells of the colon or the rectum become abnormal and begin to divide without control, forming a mass called a polyp; and

Whereas, The National Cancer Institute (NCI) reports that small polyps, if not detected and removed promptly, will evolve into colorectal cancer within 5 to 15 years; and                      

Whereas, According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer found among Americans, and an estimated 106,370 new cases of colon cancer and 40,570 new cases of rectal cancer were found in the United States in 2003, causing about 56,730 deaths combined; and

Whereas, Colorectal cancer kills over 1,500 residents of New York City annually, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH); and

Whereas, The NCI suggests that colon cancer may be prevented with a diet low in fat and calories and high in fiber, at least 30 minutes of physical activity on 5 or more days of the week and regular use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; and

Whereas, The National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance (NCCRA) also reports that approximately two-thirds of the deaths from colorectal cancer are preventable with regular screening and simple prevention techniques; and

Whereas, According to DOHMH, a colonoscopy can detect more than 95% of early colon cancer with an examination of the colon and can also remove polyps before they develop into cancer; and

Whereas, According to DOHMH, almost half of all people over the age of fifty have colon polyps, which may develop into cancer; and

Whereas, The DOHMH reports that less than half of City residents who are age fifty or older get regular colon cancer screenings; and

                          Whereas, A study by the New York Academy of Medicine shows that screening for colon cancer is lower among racial and ethnic minorities, indicating that in New York City, only 28% of Hispanics and 34% of African-Americans over the age of fifty have undergone colon cancer screening, compared to 48% of whites; and

Whereas, Raising awareness of the importance of regular colon cancer screenings and prevention techniques will help safeguard the heath and well-being of all City residents; and

Whereas, March has been designated as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Council of the City of New York recognizes March as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and calls upon the appropriate committee of the Council to hold a hearing regarding this disease and its prevention.  

 

CR

LS #482

2/23/04