New York City Council Header
Meeting Name: Committee on Consumer Affairs and Business Licensing Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 6/8/2021 1:00 PM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: REMOTE HEARING (VIRTUAL ROOM 2)
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
Meeting video:  
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            Roll call Not available
T2021-7645 *   Oversight - Protections for Delivery WorkersOversight Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
T2021-7645 *   Oversight - Protections for Delivery WorkersOversight Filed, by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2163-2020 *Antonio Reynoso  Allowing a food service establishment surcharge, and to repeal local law number 100 for the year 2020, relating to a COVID-19 recovery charge.IntroductionCurrent City rules prohibit restaurants from adding surcharges to listed food and drink prices. This bill would allow restaurants to impose a “Food Service Establishment Surcharge” of up to 15 percent of a customer’s total bill, as long as restaurants pay their tipped workers a cash wage that is not less than the City’s minimum wage of $15 per hour. Tips received by such workers would not be credited towards the hourly cash wage. The surcharge would have to be clearly disclosed on the menu, final bill and receipt, and the disclosure must be explicit that the additional charge is not a gratuity.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2163-2020 *Antonio Reynoso  Allowing a food service establishment surcharge, and to repeal local law number 100 for the year 2020, relating to a COVID-19 recovery charge.IntroductionCurrent City rules prohibit restaurants from adding surcharges to listed food and drink prices. This bill would allow restaurants to impose a “Food Service Establishment Surcharge” of up to 15 percent of a customer’s total bill, as long as restaurants pay their tipped workers a cash wage that is not less than the City’s minimum wage of $15 per hour. Tips received by such workers would not be credited towards the hourly cash wage. The surcharge would have to be clearly disclosed on the menu, final bill and receipt, and the disclosure must be explicit that the additional charge is not a gratuity.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2288-2021 *Justin L. Brannan  Requiring third-party food delivery services and third-party courier services to provide food delivery workers with insulated food delivery bags, and authorizing the commissioner of the department of consumer and worker protection to deny, suspend, revokeIntroductionThis bill would require food delivery applications and couriers to make available insulated bags to any delivery worker who has completed at least six deliveries for the company. The food delivery application or courier would not be permitted to charge their delivery worker any money for the bag. The bag would also have to comply with Section 1235 of the State Vehicle and Traffic Law, which prohibits bicyclists from carrying bags or other articles unless they can keep at least one hand on the handlebars. The bill would add a provision to the licensing scheme passed last month allowing the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection to suspend, revoke, deny or refuse to renew a food delivery application license if any provision relating to protections for delivery workers was violated twice in the previous two years.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2288-2021 *Justin L. Brannan  Requiring third-party food delivery services and third-party courier services to provide food delivery workers with insulated food delivery bags, and authorizing the commissioner of the department of consumer and worker protection to deny, suspend, revokeIntroductionThis bill would require food delivery applications and couriers to make available insulated bags to any delivery worker who has completed at least six deliveries for the company. The food delivery application or courier would not be permitted to charge their delivery worker any money for the bag. The bag would also have to comply with Section 1235 of the State Vehicle and Traffic Law, which prohibits bicyclists from carrying bags or other articles unless they can keep at least one hand on the handlebars. The bill would add a provision to the licensing scheme passed last month allowing the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection to suspend, revoke, deny or refuse to renew a food delivery application license if any provision relating to protections for delivery workers was violated twice in the previous two years.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2289-2021 *Justin L. Brannan  Establishing general provisions related to working conditions for third-party service workers and requiring that third-party food delivery services permit delivery workers to set limitations on distance and route for deliveries.IntroductionThis bill would require food delivery applications and couriers to provide delivery workers with the opportunity to set: (i) a maximum distance per trip they will travel; and (ii) that the worker will not accept trips over bridges or tunnels. Applications and couriers would be obligated to allow workers to change parameters at any time. Applications or couriers could not offer a worker trips inconsistent with the parameters or penalize a worker for their parameters. The following information would be provided before a trip: • address where the food, beverage or other goods must be picked up; • estimated time and distance per trip; • any gratuity; and • compensation to be paid, excluding gratuity. In addition, the bill would set forth various definitions; obligations on the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection, applications and couriers; and enforcement options, including those available to the City and to workers, that would apply to all laws relating to food delivery workers.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2289-2021 *Justin L. Brannan  Establishing general provisions related to working conditions for third-party service workers and requiring that third-party food delivery services permit delivery workers to set limitations on distance and route for deliveries.IntroductionThis bill would require food delivery applications and couriers to provide delivery workers with the opportunity to set: (i) a maximum distance per trip they will travel; and (ii) that the worker will not accept trips over bridges or tunnels. Applications and couriers would be obligated to allow workers to change parameters at any time. Applications or couriers could not offer a worker trips inconsistent with the parameters or penalize a worker for their parameters. The following information would be provided before a trip: • address where the food, beverage or other goods must be picked up; • estimated time and distance per trip; • any gratuity; and • compensation to be paid, excluding gratuity. In addition, the bill would set forth various definitions; obligations on the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection, applications and couriers; and enforcement options, including those available to the City and to workers, that would apply to all laws relating to food delivery workers.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2294-2021 *Brad S. Lander  Establishing minimum per trip payments to third-party food delivery service and third-party courier service workers.IntroductionThis bill would require the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection to study the working conditions of third party food delivery workers, including income, expenses, required equipment, hours worked and safety. Following the study, the Department would be required to promulgate rules establishing the minimum per trip payments that must be made to third party food delivery service workers by January 1, 2023.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2294-2021 *Brad S. Lander  Establishing minimum per trip payments to third-party food delivery service and third-party courier service workers.IntroductionThis bill would require the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection to study the working conditions of third party food delivery workers, including income, expenses, required equipment, hours worked and safety. Following the study, the Department would be required to promulgate rules establishing the minimum per trip payments that must be made to third party food delivery service workers by January 1, 2023.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2296-2021 *Carlos Menchaca  Establishing standards for payment of food delivery workers.IntroductionThe bill would prohibit food delivery apps and couriers from charging delivery workers for the payment of their wages. It would also require the food apps and couriers pay their delivery workers for their work at least once per week.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2296-2021 *Carlos Menchaca  Establishing standards for payment of food delivery workers.IntroductionThe bill would prohibit food delivery apps and couriers from charging delivery workers for the payment of their wages. It would also require the food apps and couriers pay their delivery workers for their work at least once per week.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2298-2021 *Carlina Rivera   Agreements between third-party food delivery services and food service establishments and the provision of toilet facility access to food delivery workers.IntroductionThis bill would require that food delivery applications include a provision in contracts with restaurants requiring them to make their toilet facilities available for delivery workers’ use, as long as the delivery worker seeks to access the facilities while picking up a food or beverage order for delivery.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2298-2021 *Carlina Rivera   Agreements between third-party food delivery services and food service establishments and the provision of toilet facility access to food delivery workers.IntroductionThis bill would require that food delivery applications include a provision in contracts with restaurants requiring them to make their toilet facilities available for delivery workers’ use, as long as the delivery worker seeks to access the facilities while picking up a food or beverage order for delivery.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2311-2021 *Keith Powers   Data on orders placed through third-party food delivery services.IntroductionThis bill would require third-party food delivery services, entities that provide food service establishments with online order and delivery services, to share monthly information on customers who have placed a food or beverage order with an establishment, if that establishment requests the information. The information would consist of the customer’s name, phone number, e-mail address, delivery address and the contents of their orders, as described in Proposed Int. No. 2335-A. Customers would be able to opt out of the sharing of this information, and the service would be required to provide a clear disclosure to customers explaining what information would be shared with the establishment. The establishment fulfilling the customer’s order would be permitted to retain that information, which must be provided in a machine-readable format. Services could not limit the establishments’ use of the information, but the bill would prohibit the establishments from selling, renting or disclosing the information without express consent from the customer, and the customer would be able to withdraw their consent to using their information. The bill would also permit customers to request that the establishment delete their information.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2311-2021 *Keith Powers   Data on orders placed through third-party food delivery services.IntroductionThis bill would require third-party food delivery services, entities that provide food service establishments with online order and delivery services, to share monthly information on customers who have placed a food or beverage order with an establishment, if that establishment requests the information. The information would consist of the customer’s name, phone number, e-mail address, delivery address and the contents of their orders, as described in Proposed Int. No. 2335-A. Customers would be able to opt out of the sharing of this information, and the service would be required to provide a clear disclosure to customers explaining what information would be shared with the establishment. The establishment fulfilling the customer’s order would be permitted to retain that information, which must be provided in a machine-readable format. Services could not limit the establishments’ use of the information, but the bill would prohibit the establishments from selling, renting or disclosing the information without express consent from the customer, and the customer would be able to withdraw their consent to using their information. The bill would also permit customers to request that the establishment delete their information.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available