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Meeting Name: Committee on Consumer Affairs and Business Licensing Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 9/23/2020 10:30 AM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: - REMOTE HEARING (VIRTUAL ROOM 1) -
VOTE
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
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Int 2032-2020 *Andrew Cohen Proposed Int. No. 2032-ARequiring city employers to provide earned safe and sick time to employees.IntroductionOn April 3, Governor Cuomo signed into law the State Budget (Senate Bill S7506B), which included a provision that amended the New York Labor Law to require many employers to provide paid sick leave. The law takes effect on September 30, 2020. This bill aligns the City’s Paid Sick Law with the recently enacted State law, including how time is accrued and which businesses are covered. Small businesses with four or fewer employees and an income less than $1 million must provide 40 hours of unpaid safe/sick leave. Small businesses with four or fewer employees but have an income greater than $1 million must provide 40 hours of paid safe/sick leave. Most businesses with 99 or fewer employees must still provide 40 hours of paid sick leave. Large businesses of 100 or more employees must provide up to 56 hours of paid safe/sick leave.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2032-2020 *Andrew Cohen  Requiring city employers to provide earned safe and sick time to employees.IntroductionOn April 3, Governor Cuomo signed into law the State Budget (Senate Bill S7506B), which included a provision that amended the New York Labor Law to require many employers to provide paid sick leave. The law takes effect on September 30, 2020. This bill aligns the City’s Paid Sick Law with the recently enacted State law, including how time is accrued and which businesses are covered. Small businesses with four or fewer employees and an income less than $1 million must provide 40 hours of unpaid safe/sick leave. Small businesses with four or fewer employees but have an income greater than $1 million must provide 40 hours of paid safe/sick leave. Most businesses with 99 or fewer employees must still provide 40 hours of paid sick leave. Large businesses of 100 or more employees must provide up to 56 hours of paid safe/sick leave.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 2032-2020 *Andrew Cohen  Requiring city employers to provide earned safe and sick time to employees.IntroductionOn April 3, Governor Cuomo signed into law the State Budget (Senate Bill S7506B), which included a provision that amended the New York Labor Law to require many employers to provide paid sick leave. The law takes effect on September 30, 2020. This bill aligns the City’s Paid Sick Law with the recently enacted State law, including how time is accrued and which businesses are covered. Small businesses with four or fewer employees and an income less than $1 million must provide 40 hours of unpaid safe/sick leave. Small businesses with four or fewer employees but have an income greater than $1 million must provide 40 hours of paid safe/sick leave. Most businesses with 99 or fewer employees must still provide 40 hours of paid sick leave. Large businesses of 100 or more employees must provide up to 56 hours of paid safe/sick leave.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2032-2020 AAndrew Cohen  Requiring city employers to provide earned safe and sick time to employees.IntroductionOn April 3, Governor Cuomo signed into law the State Budget (Senate Bill S7506B), which included a provision that amended the New York Labor Law to require many employers to provide paid sick leave. The law takes effect on September 30, 2020. This bill aligns the City’s Paid Sick Law with the recently enacted State law, including how time is accrued and which businesses are covered. Small businesses with four or fewer employees and an income less than $1 million must provide 40 hours of unpaid safe/sick leave. Small businesses with four or fewer employees but have an income greater than $1 million must provide 40 hours of paid safe/sick leave. Most businesses with 99 or fewer employees must still provide 40 hours of paid sick leave. Large businesses of 100 or more employees must provide up to 56 hours of paid safe/sick leave.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 2049-2020 *Mark Levine Proposed Int. No. 2049-ADisplaced hotel service workers and hotel service disruption notifications.IntroductionThe bill would establish protections for displaced hotel service workers in the event of a change in control of a hotel, such as a sale or bankruptcy. Once new ownership commences, the owner would be required to provide employment to the existing hotel workers for at least 90 days. During this retention period, existing workers would be paid the same wage rate or higher. At the end of the 90-day period, the new employer would perform an evaluation of the worker and, if the worker receives a satisfactory result, the new employer would be required to offer continued employment. In addition, the bill would require hotels to notify guests of service disruptions that would substantially affect their stay. A hotel would be prohibited from charging a fee or penalty for cancellations made because of a service disruption.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2049-2020 *Mark Levine  Displaced hotel service workers and hotel service disruption notifications.IntroductionThe bill would establish protections for displaced hotel service workers in the event of a change in control of a hotel, such as a sale or bankruptcy. Once new ownership commences, the owner would be required to provide employment to the existing hotel workers for at least 90 days. During this retention period, existing workers would be paid the same wage rate or higher. At the end of the 90-day period, the new employer would perform an evaluation of the worker and, if the worker receives a satisfactory result, the new employer would be required to offer continued employment. In addition, the bill would require hotels to notify guests of service disruptions that would substantially affect their stay. A hotel would be prohibited from charging a fee or penalty for cancellations made because of a service disruption.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 2049-2020 *Mark Levine  Displaced hotel service workers and hotel service disruption notifications.IntroductionThe bill would establish protections for displaced hotel service workers in the event of a change in control of a hotel, such as a sale or bankruptcy. Once new ownership commences, the owner would be required to provide employment to the existing hotel workers for at least 90 days. During this retention period, existing workers would be paid the same wage rate or higher. At the end of the 90-day period, the new employer would perform an evaluation of the worker and, if the worker receives a satisfactory result, the new employer would be required to offer continued employment. In addition, the bill would require hotels to notify guests of service disruptions that would substantially affect their stay. A hotel would be prohibited from charging a fee or penalty for cancellations made because of a service disruption.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2049-2020 AMark Levine  Displaced hotel service workers and hotel service disruption notifications.IntroductionThe bill would establish protections for displaced hotel service workers in the event of a change in control of a hotel, such as a sale or bankruptcy. Once new ownership commences, the owner would be required to provide employment to the existing hotel workers for at least 90 days. During this retention period, existing workers would be paid the same wage rate or higher. At the end of the 90-day period, the new employer would perform an evaluation of the worker and, if the worker receives a satisfactory result, the new employer would be required to offer continued employment. In addition, the bill would require hotels to notify guests of service disruptions that would substantially affect their stay. A hotel would be prohibited from charging a fee or penalty for cancellations made because of a service disruption.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available