New York City Council Header
Meeting Name: Committee on Transportation Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 6/12/2019 1:00 PM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: Council Chambers - City Hall
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
Meeting video:  
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Int 1457-2019 *Carlos Menchaca  Bicyclists following pedestrian control signals.IntroductionThis bill would establish that bicyclists crossing a roadway at an intersection must follow pedestrian control signals except where otherwise indicated by traffic control devices. However, bicyclists will be required to yield to pedestrians in the crosswalk.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1457-2019 *Carlos Menchaca  Bicyclists following pedestrian control signals.IntroductionThis bill would establish that bicyclists crossing a roadway at an intersection must follow pedestrian control signals except where otherwise indicated by traffic control devices. However, bicyclists will be required to yield to pedestrians in the crosswalk.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1557-2019 *Corey D. Johnson  Five-year plans for city streets, sidewalks, and pedestrian spaces.IntroductionThis bill would require the Department of Transportation (“DOT”) to issue and implement a transportation master plan every five years. The plan’s goals would be to prioritize the safety of all street users, the use of mass transit, the reduction of vehicle emissions, and access for individuals with disabilities. Each plan would include certain benchmarks. The first plan would be due in December of 2021 and would include: • 150 miles of physically or camera-protected bus lanes over five years, with at least 20 miles in the first year and at least 30 miles during each subsequent year; • Transit signal priority at 750 intersections during the first year and 1,000 intersections during each subsequent year; • 250 miles of protected bike lanes over five years, with at least 30 miles in the first year and 50 miles in each subsequent year; • Bus stop upgrades like benches, shelters, and real-time passenger information at 500 bus stops each year; • Redesigning at least 2,000 signalized intersections over five years, with at least 400 redesigns each year; • Accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections, with at least 500 installations each year; • Assessing and amending commercial loading zones and truck routes; • Developing parking policies to promote the master plan’s goals of safety, mass transit use, reduced vehicle emissions, and access for individuals with disabilities; and • Within the first two years, create and maintain one million square feet of pedestrian space. The following master plan, due in 2026, would include the completion of a connected bike lane network, installation of physically or camera-protected bus lanes on all routes where they can be installed, installation of accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections over five years, installation of bus stop upgrades at all bus stops, redesign at least 2,000 intersections over five years, and installation of pedestrian ramps at no fewer than 3,000 street corners. The bill also requires reporting in February of each year regarding an update on any changes to the master plan and the progress towards achieving the benchmarks laid out in the plan. Finally, DOT would be required to conduct a public education campaign on the benefits of each master plan.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1557-2019 *Corey D. Johnson  Five-year plans for city streets, sidewalks, and pedestrian spaces.IntroductionThis bill would require the Department of Transportation (“DOT”) to issue and implement a transportation master plan every five years. The plan’s goals would be to prioritize the safety of all street users, the use of mass transit, the reduction of vehicle emissions, and access for individuals with disabilities. Each plan would include certain benchmarks. The first plan would be due in December of 2021 and would include: • 150 miles of physically or camera-protected bus lanes over five years, with at least 20 miles in the first year and at least 30 miles during each subsequent year; • Transit signal priority at 750 intersections during the first year and 1,000 intersections during each subsequent year; • 250 miles of protected bike lanes over five years, with at least 30 miles in the first year and 50 miles in each subsequent year; • Bus stop upgrades like benches, shelters, and real-time passenger information at 500 bus stops each year; • Redesigning at least 2,000 signalized intersections over five years, with at least 400 redesigns each year; • Accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections, with at least 500 installations each year; • Assessing and amending commercial loading zones and truck routes; • Developing parking policies to promote the master plan’s goals of safety, mass transit use, reduced vehicle emissions, and access for individuals with disabilities; and • Within the first two years, create and maintain one million square feet of pedestrian space. The following master plan, due in 2026, would include the completion of a connected bike lane network, installation of physically or camera-protected bus lanes on all routes where they can be installed, installation of accessible pedestrian signals at no fewer than 2,500 intersections over five years, installation of bus stop upgrades at all bus stops, redesign at least 2,000 intersections over five years, and installation of pedestrian ramps at no fewer than 3,000 street corners. The bill also requires reporting in February of each year regarding an update on any changes to the master plan and the progress towards achieving the benchmarks laid out in the plan. Finally, DOT would be required to conduct a public education campaign on the benefits of each master plan.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available