New York City Council Header
Meeting Name: Committee on Civil Rights (inactive) Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 3/8/2016 2:00 PM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: 250 Broadway - Committee Rm, 14th Fl.
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
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Int 0805-2015 *Daniel Dromm  Proposed Int. No. 805-AExpanding the protections of the city of NY human rights law with regard to public accommodations, and making certain technical corrections.IntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law prohibits anyone who owns, leases, runs or manages a place of public accommodation (such as a store, restaurant, or government agency), or their employees, from denying someone access to the product or benefit being offered to the public for discriminatory reasons. This bill amends that law in two key ways. First, this bill adds three types of people to the list of those who cannot discriminate: anyone who buys or sells a franchise and anyone who leases space to a provider of public accommodations. Second, the bill declares that it is illegal to offer a person who is or is perceived to be a member of a protected class the same benefits, services, or privileges as everyone else, but in such a way that they do not receive “the full and equal enjoyment” of those benefits on “equal terms and conditions,” or to use discriminatory advertisements and public statements. The bill will also make additional minor or technical corrections to the existing law.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0805-2015 *Daniel Dromm   Expanding the protections of the city of NY human rights law with regard to public accommodations, and making certain technical corrections.IntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law prohibits anyone who owns, leases, runs or manages a place of public accommodation (such as a store, restaurant, or government agency), or their employees, from denying someone access to the product or benefit being offered to the public for discriminatory reasons. This bill amends that law in two key ways. First, this bill adds three types of people to the list of those who cannot discriminate: anyone who buys or sells a franchise and anyone who leases space to a provider of public accommodations. Second, the bill declares that it is illegal to offer a person who is or is perceived to be a member of a protected class the same benefits, services, or privileges as everyone else, but in such a way that they do not receive “the full and equal enjoyment” of those benefits on “equal terms and conditions,” or to use discriminatory advertisements and public statements. The bill will also make additional minor or technical corrections to the existing law.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0805-2015 *Daniel Dromm   Expanding the protections of the city of NY human rights law with regard to public accommodations, and making certain technical corrections.IntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law prohibits anyone who owns, leases, runs or manages a place of public accommodation (such as a store, restaurant, or government agency), or their employees, from denying someone access to the product or benefit being offered to the public for discriminatory reasons. This bill amends that law in two key ways. First, this bill adds three types of people to the list of those who cannot discriminate: anyone who buys or sells a franchise and anyone who leases space to a provider of public accommodations. Second, the bill declares that it is illegal to offer a person who is or is perceived to be a member of a protected class the same benefits, services, or privileges as everyone else, but in such a way that they do not receive “the full and equal enjoyment” of those benefits on “equal terms and conditions,” or to use discriminatory advertisements and public statements. The bill will also make additional minor or technical corrections to the existing law.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0805-2015 ADaniel Dromm   Expanding the protections of the city of NY human rights law with regard to public accommodations, and making certain technical corrections.IntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law prohibits anyone who owns, leases, runs or manages a place of public accommodation (such as a store, restaurant, or government agency), or their employees, from denying someone access to the product or benefit being offered to the public for discriminatory reasons. This bill amends that law in two key ways. First, this bill adds three types of people to the list of those who cannot discriminate: anyone who buys or sells a franchise and anyone who leases space to a provider of public accommodations. Second, the bill declares that it is illegal to offer a person who is or is perceived to be a member of a protected class the same benefits, services, or privileges as everyone else, but in such a way that they do not receive “the full and equal enjoyment” of those benefits on “equal terms and conditions,” or to use discriminatory advertisements and public statements. The bill will also make additional minor or technical corrections to the existing law.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0814-2015 *Brad S. Lander Proposed Int. No. 814-AConstruction of the New York city human rights law.IntroductionThe 2005 Restoration Act provided that the New York City Human Rights Law is to be interpreted liberally and independently of similar federal or state provisions. This bill would recognize certain court cases that have given the Human Rights Law an independent construction as required by the Restoration Act. The bill also would require that exemptions and exceptions from the general provisions of the Human Rights Law be construed narrowly in order to maximize deterrence of discriminatory conduct.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0814-2015 *Brad S. Lander  Construction of the New York city human rights law.IntroductionThe 2005 Restoration Act provided that the New York City Human Rights Law is to be interpreted liberally and independently of similar federal or state provisions. This bill would recognize certain court cases that have given the Human Rights Law an independent construction as required by the Restoration Act. The bill also would require that exemptions and exceptions from the general provisions of the Human Rights Law be construed narrowly in order to maximize deterrence of discriminatory conduct.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0814-2015 *Brad S. Lander  Construction of the New York city human rights law.IntroductionThe 2005 Restoration Act provided that the New York City Human Rights Law is to be interpreted liberally and independently of similar federal or state provisions. This bill would recognize certain court cases that have given the Human Rights Law an independent construction as required by the Restoration Act. The bill also would require that exemptions and exceptions from the general provisions of the Human Rights Law be construed narrowly in order to maximize deterrence of discriminatory conduct.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0814-2015 ABrad S. Lander  Construction of the New York city human rights law.IntroductionThe 2005 Restoration Act provided that the New York City Human Rights Law is to be interpreted liberally and independently of similar federal or state provisions. This bill would recognize certain court cases that have given the Human Rights Law an independent construction as required by the Restoration Act. The bill also would require that exemptions and exceptions from the general provisions of the Human Rights Law be construed narrowly in order to maximize deterrence of discriminatory conduct.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0818-2015 *Darlene Mealy Proposed Int. No. 818-AProvision of attorney’s fees under the city human rights lawIntroductionThis bill amends the attorney’s fees provisions of the city human rights law to include expert fees in attorney’s fees awards. This bill allows the Human Rights Commission to award attorney’s fees in complaints brought before it. This bill also directs courts and the Human Rights Commission to base attorney’s fee awards on the hourly market-rate charged by attorneys of similar skill and experience practicing in New York County, which customarily has the highest attorney rates in New York City.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0818-2015 *Darlene Mealy  Provision of attorney’s fees under the city human rights lawIntroductionThis bill amends the attorney’s fees provisions of the city human rights law to include expert fees in attorney’s fees awards. This bill allows the Human Rights Commission to award attorney’s fees in complaints brought before it. This bill also directs courts and the Human Rights Commission to base attorney’s fee awards on the hourly market-rate charged by attorneys of similar skill and experience practicing in New York County, which customarily has the highest attorney rates in New York City.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0818-2015 *Darlene Mealy  Provision of attorney’s fees under the city human rights lawIntroductionThis bill amends the attorney’s fees provisions of the city human rights law to include expert fees in attorney’s fees awards. This bill allows the Human Rights Commission to award attorney’s fees in complaints brought before it. This bill also directs courts and the Human Rights Commission to base attorney’s fee awards on the hourly market-rate charged by attorneys of similar skill and experience practicing in New York County, which customarily has the highest attorney rates in New York City.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0818-2015 ADarlene Mealy  Provision of attorney’s fees under the city human rights lawIntroductionThis bill amends the attorney’s fees provisions of the city human rights law to include expert fees in attorney’s fees awards. This bill allows the Human Rights Commission to award attorney’s fees in complaints brought before it. This bill also directs courts and the Human Rights Commission to base attorney’s fee awards on the hourly market-rate charged by attorneys of similar skill and experience practicing in New York County, which customarily has the highest attorney rates in New York City.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0819-2015 *Rosie Mendez  Repeal of subdivision 16 of section 8-107 of such code relating to the applicability of provisions of the human rights law regarding sexual orientation.IntroductionThis bill would repeal Administrative Code § 8-107(16), which addresses how the New York City Human Rights Law’s (HRL) protections against discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation should be construed. The subdivision to be repealed provides that the HRL should not be construed to (a) restrict an employer’s right to insist than an employee meet bona-fide job qualifications; (b) authorize or require affirmative action on the basis of sexual orientation; (c) limit or override any exemptions from the provisions of the HRL; (d) make lawful any act that violates the New York Penal Law; or (e) “[e]ndorse any particular behavior or way of life.”Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0819-2015 *Rosie Mendez  Repeal of subdivision 16 of section 8-107 of such code relating to the applicability of provisions of the human rights law regarding sexual orientation.IntroductionThis bill would repeal Administrative Code § 8-107(16), which addresses how the New York City Human Rights Law’s (HRL) protections against discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation should be construed. The subdivision to be repealed provides that the HRL should not be construed to (a) restrict an employer’s right to insist than an employee meet bona-fide job qualifications; (b) authorize or require affirmative action on the basis of sexual orientation; (c) limit or override any exemptions from the provisions of the HRL; (d) make lawful any act that violates the New York Penal Law; or (e) “[e]ndorse any particular behavior or way of life.”Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0832-2015 *Jumaane D. Williams Proposed Int. No. 832-AProhibiting discrimination in housing accommodations on the basis of an individual’s status as a victim of domestic violence.IntroductionThis bill makes it an unlawful discriminatory practice for landlords and other agents of real estate to refuse to sell, rent or lease, or otherwise deny or withhold an interest in a housing accommodation because of an individual’s actual or perceived status as a victim of domestic violence, or as a victim of sex offenses or stalking.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0832-2015 *Jumaane D. Williams  Prohibiting discrimination in housing accommodations on the basis of an individual’s status as a victim of domestic violence.IntroductionThis bill makes it an unlawful discriminatory practice for landlords and other agents of real estate to refuse to sell, rent or lease, or otherwise deny or withhold an interest in a housing accommodation because of an individual’s actual or perceived status as a victim of domestic violence, or as a victim of sex offenses or stalking.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0832-2015 *Jumaane D. Williams  Prohibiting discrimination in housing accommodations on the basis of an individual’s status as a victim of domestic violence.IntroductionThis bill makes it an unlawful discriminatory practice for landlords and other agents of real estate to refuse to sell, rent or lease, or otherwise deny or withhold an interest in a housing accommodation because of an individual’s actual or perceived status as a victim of domestic violence, or as a victim of sex offenses or stalking.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0832-2015 AJumaane D. Williams  Prohibiting discrimination in housing accommodations on the basis of an individual’s status as a victim of domestic violence.IntroductionThis bill makes it an unlawful discriminatory practice for landlords and other agents of real estate to refuse to sell, rent or lease, or otherwise deny or withhold an interest in a housing accommodation because of an individual’s actual or perceived status as a victim of domestic violence, or as a victim of sex offenses or stalking.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available