New York City Council Header
Meeting Name: Committee on Health Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 12/16/2014 1:00 PM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: Committee Room - City Hall
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
Meeting video:  
Attachments: Attachments - Int. No. 55-A, Attachments - Int. No. 73-A, Attachments - Int. No. 136-A, Attachments - Int. No. 146-A, Attachments - Int. No. 358-A
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Int 0055-2014 *Elizabeth S. Crowley Proposed Int. No. 55-ARegulating pet shops.Introduction Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0055-2014 *Elizabeth S. Crowley  Regulating pet shops.Introduction Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0055-2014 *Elizabeth S. Crowley  Regulating pet shops.Introduction Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0055-2014 AElizabeth S. Crowley  Regulating pet shops.Introduction Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0073-2014 *Corey D. Johnson Proposed Int. No. 73-AUpdating the definition of “pet shop” within the animal abuse registration act.IntroductionThis bill would change the definition of pet shop in the Animal Abuse Registration Act (AARA) to include pet shops that sell cats and dogs. The AARA mandates the establishment of an animal abuse registry listing persons 18 or older who reside in New York City that were convicted of animal abuse crimes. It requires pet shops to consult the registry before selling an animal to any prospective purchaser and prohibits the transfer of any animal to a person whose name appears on the registry.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0073-2014 *Corey D. Johnson  Updating the definition of “pet shop” within the animal abuse registration act.IntroductionThis bill would change the definition of pet shop in the Animal Abuse Registration Act (AARA) to include pet shops that sell cats and dogs. The AARA mandates the establishment of an animal abuse registry listing persons 18 or older who reside in New York City that were convicted of animal abuse crimes. It requires pet shops to consult the registry before selling an animal to any prospective purchaser and prohibits the transfer of any animal to a person whose name appears on the registry.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0073-2014 *Corey D. Johnson  Updating the definition of “pet shop” within the animal abuse registration act.IntroductionThis bill would change the definition of pet shop in the Animal Abuse Registration Act (AARA) to include pet shops that sell cats and dogs. The AARA mandates the establishment of an animal abuse registry listing persons 18 or older who reside in New York City that were convicted of animal abuse crimes. It requires pet shops to consult the registry before selling an animal to any prospective purchaser and prohibits the transfer of any animal to a person whose name appears on the registry.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0073-2014 ACorey D. Johnson  Updating the definition of “pet shop” within the animal abuse registration act.IntroductionThis bill would change the definition of pet shop in the Animal Abuse Registration Act (AARA) to include pet shops that sell cats and dogs. The AARA mandates the establishment of an animal abuse registry listing persons 18 or older who reside in New York City that were convicted of animal abuse crimes. It requires pet shops to consult the registry before selling an animal to any prospective purchaser and prohibits the transfer of any animal to a person whose name appears on the registry.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0136-2014 *Elizabeth S. Crowley Proposed Int. No. 136-ASpaying, neutering and licensing of animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelters and Sterilization Act to prohibit the sale of any dog or cat in any pet store unless such animal has been spayed or neutered. It would require that such procedures be performed by a licensed veterinarian and that the animals be no younger than eight weeks and weigh no less than two pounds. The bill would also prohibit a pet shop from releasing any dog to a customer who resides in New York City, unless such customer first completes a dog license application and tenders to the pet store the dog license application fee. Pet shops would be required to report information about all dogs sold to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on a monthly basis. A pet shop that violates the provisions of this law related to sterilization and dog licensing, or the provisions of law added by Proposed Int. No. 146-A related to microchipping, would be subject to a penalty of $500 per violation.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0136-2014 *Elizabeth S. Crowley  Spaying, neutering and licensing of animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelters and Sterilization Act to prohibit the sale of any dog or cat in any pet store unless such animal has been spayed or neutered. It would require that such procedures be performed by a licensed veterinarian and that the animals be no younger than eight weeks and weigh no less than two pounds. The bill would also prohibit a pet shop from releasing any dog to a customer who resides in New York City, unless such customer first completes a dog license application and tenders to the pet store the dog license application fee. Pet shops would be required to report information about all dogs sold to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on a monthly basis. A pet shop that violates the provisions of this law related to sterilization and dog licensing, or the provisions of law added by Proposed Int. No. 146-A related to microchipping, would be subject to a penalty of $500 per violation.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0136-2014 *Elizabeth S. Crowley  Spaying, neutering and licensing of animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelters and Sterilization Act to prohibit the sale of any dog or cat in any pet store unless such animal has been spayed or neutered. It would require that such procedures be performed by a licensed veterinarian and that the animals be no younger than eight weeks and weigh no less than two pounds. The bill would also prohibit a pet shop from releasing any dog to a customer who resides in New York City, unless such customer first completes a dog license application and tenders to the pet store the dog license application fee. Pet shops would be required to report information about all dogs sold to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on a monthly basis. A pet shop that violates the provisions of this law related to sterilization and dog licensing, or the provisions of law added by Proposed Int. No. 146-A related to microchipping, would be subject to a penalty of $500 per violation.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0136-2014 AElizabeth S. Crowley  Spaying, neutering and licensing of animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelters and Sterilization Act to prohibit the sale of any dog or cat in any pet store unless such animal has been spayed or neutered. It would require that such procedures be performed by a licensed veterinarian and that the animals be no younger than eight weeks and weigh no less than two pounds. The bill would also prohibit a pet shop from releasing any dog to a customer who resides in New York City, unless such customer first completes a dog license application and tenders to the pet store the dog license application fee. Pet shops would be required to report information about all dogs sold to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on a monthly basis. A pet shop that violates the provisions of this law related to sterilization and dog licensing, or the provisions of law added by Proposed Int. No. 146-A related to microchipping, would be subject to a penalty of $500 per violation.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0146-2014 *Corey D. Johnson Proposed Int. No. 146-AMicrochipping animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelter and Sterilization Act to prohibit a pet shop from releasing a cat or dog to a purchaser until such dog or cat has been implanted with a microchip and such microchip has been registered with the purchaser’s contact information. It would require pet shops to maintain records of the date of sale and the microchip registration information for a period of ten years. Pet shops that allow shelters and non-profit rescues to use their property for the purpose of making animals available for adoption would be exempt from this bill with respect to those animals.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0146-2014 *Corey D. Johnson  Microchipping animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelter and Sterilization Act to prohibit a pet shop from releasing a cat or dog to a purchaser until such dog or cat has been implanted with a microchip and such microchip has been registered with the purchaser’s contact information. It would require pet shops to maintain records of the date of sale and the microchip registration information for a period of ten years. Pet shops that allow shelters and non-profit rescues to use their property for the purpose of making animals available for adoption would be exempt from this bill with respect to those animals.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0146-2014 *Corey D. Johnson  Microchipping animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelter and Sterilization Act to prohibit a pet shop from releasing a cat or dog to a purchaser until such dog or cat has been implanted with a microchip and such microchip has been registered with the purchaser’s contact information. It would require pet shops to maintain records of the date of sale and the microchip registration information for a period of ten years. Pet shops that allow shelters and non-profit rescues to use their property for the purpose of making animals available for adoption would be exempt from this bill with respect to those animals.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0146-2014 ACorey D. Johnson  Microchipping animals sold in pet shops.IntroductionThis bill would amend the Animal Shelter and Sterilization Act to prohibit a pet shop from releasing a cat or dog to a purchaser until such dog or cat has been implanted with a microchip and such microchip has been registered with the purchaser’s contact information. It would require pet shops to maintain records of the date of sale and the microchip registration information for a period of ten years. Pet shops that allow shelters and non-profit rescues to use their property for the purpose of making animals available for adoption would be exempt from this bill with respect to those animals.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available
Int 0358-2014 *Margaret S. Chin Proposed Int. No. 358-ARegulating social adult day care.IntroductionThe bill would require that social adult day cares—programs which provide functionally impaired individuals, such as those suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia, with personal care, nutritious meals, and the opportunity to socialize in a safe, supervised setting—operating in the City that do not receive direct City or State funding register with the Department for the Aging (DFTA) and adhere to the same standards that apply to directly-funded programs. Program and registration requirements would be enforced through civil penalties. DFTA would promulgate regulations outlining the penalties for specific violations, which would range from $250 to $500 per day, except that failure to register would result in a penalty of $250 to $1,000 per day. The Department of Consumer Affairs (or such other agency designated by the Mayor) will work with DFTA to issue violations for failure to register or follow program standards. In addition, DFTA would appoint an ombudsperson to receive complaints, conduct investigations regarding programs, and refer results of such investigations to any managed long-term care companies reimbursing such program, the New York City Department of Investigation, and the State, as necessary.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0358-2014 *Margaret S. Chin  Regulating social adult day care.IntroductionThe bill would require that social adult day cares—programs which provide functionally impaired individuals, such as those suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia, with personal care, nutritious meals, and the opportunity to socialize in a safe, supervised setting—operating in the City that do not receive direct City or State funding register with the Department for the Aging (DFTA) and adhere to the same standards that apply to directly-funded programs. Program and registration requirements would be enforced through civil penalties. DFTA would promulgate regulations outlining the penalties for specific violations, which would range from $250 to $500 per day, except that failure to register would result in a penalty of $250 to $1,000 per day. The Department of Consumer Affairs (or such other agency designated by the Mayor) will work with DFTA to issue violations for failure to register or follow program standards. In addition, DFTA would appoint an ombudsperson to receive complaints, conduct investigations regarding programs, and refer results of such investigations to any managed long-term care companies reimbursing such program, the New York City Department of Investigation, and the State, as necessary.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0358-2014 *Margaret S. Chin  Regulating social adult day care.IntroductionThe bill would require that social adult day cares—programs which provide functionally impaired individuals, such as those suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia, with personal care, nutritious meals, and the opportunity to socialize in a safe, supervised setting—operating in the City that do not receive direct City or State funding register with the Department for the Aging (DFTA) and adhere to the same standards that apply to directly-funded programs. Program and registration requirements would be enforced through civil penalties. DFTA would promulgate regulations outlining the penalties for specific violations, which would range from $250 to $500 per day, except that failure to register would result in a penalty of $250 to $1,000 per day. The Department of Consumer Affairs (or such other agency designated by the Mayor) will work with DFTA to issue violations for failure to register or follow program standards. In addition, DFTA would appoint an ombudsperson to receive complaints, conduct investigations regarding programs, and refer results of such investigations to any managed long-term care companies reimbursing such program, the New York City Department of Investigation, and the State, as necessary.Amended by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0358-2014 AMargaret S. Chin  Regulating social adult day care.IntroductionThe bill would require that social adult day cares—programs which provide functionally impaired individuals, such as those suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia, with personal care, nutritious meals, and the opportunity to socialize in a safe, supervised setting—operating in the City that do not receive direct City or State funding register with the Department for the Aging (DFTA) and adhere to the same standards that apply to directly-funded programs. Program and registration requirements would be enforced through civil penalties. DFTA would promulgate regulations outlining the penalties for specific violations, which would range from $250 to $500 per day, except that failure to register would result in a penalty of $250 to $1,000 per day. The Department of Consumer Affairs (or such other agency designated by the Mayor) will work with DFTA to issue violations for failure to register or follow program standards. In addition, DFTA would appoint an ombudsperson to receive complaints, conduct investigations regarding programs, and refer results of such investigations to any managed long-term care companies reimbursing such program, the New York City Department of Investigation, and the State, as necessary.Approved by CommitteePass Action details Not available