New York City Council Header
File #: Res 1444-2017    Version: * Name: Affirming the right to collectively bargain for workers in NYC.
Type: Resolution Status: Adopted
Committee: Committee on Civil Service and Labor
On agenda: 4/25/2017
Enactment date: Law number:
Title: Resolution affirming the right to collectively bargain for workers in the City of New York
Sponsors: I. Daneek Miller, Daniel Dromm , Ben Kallos, Karen Koslowitz, Margaret S. Chin, Mark Treyger
Council Member Sponsors: 6
Attachments: 1. Res. No. 1444, 2. Committee Report 4/19/17, 3. Hearing Testimony 4/19/17, 4. Hearing Transcript 4/19/17, 5. April 25, 2017 - Stated Meeting Agenda with Links to Files, 6. Committee Report 5/22/17, 7. Hearing Transcript 5/22/17, 8. Hearing Transcript - Stated Meeting 5-24-17, 9. Minutes of the Recessed Stated Meeting of May 10, 2017 held on May 24, 2017, 10. Minutes of the Stated Meeting - May 24, 2017, 11. Minutes of the Recessed Stated Meeting of May 24, 2017 held on June 6, 2017
Date Ver.Prime SponsorAction ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsMultimedia
5/24/2017*I. Daneek Miller City Council Approved, by CouncilPass Action details Meeting details Not available
5/22/2017*I. Daneek Miller Committee on Civil Service and Labor Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
5/22/2017*I. Daneek Miller Committee on Civil Service and Labor Approved by CommitteePass Action details Meeting details Not available
4/25/2017*I. Daneek Miller City Council Referred to Comm by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/25/2017*I. Daneek Miller City Council Introduced by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/19/2017*I. Daneek Miller Committee on Civil Service and Labor Hearing on P-C Item by Comm  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/19/2017*I. Daneek Miller Committee on Civil Service and Labor P-C Item Laid Over by Comm  Action details Meeting details Not available

Preconsidered Res. No. 1444

 

Resolution affirming the right to collectively bargain for workers in the City of New York

 

By Council Members Miller, Dromm, Kallos, Koslowitz, Chin and Treyger

                     Whereas, Since the advent of the Industrial Revolution, organized labor has played a crucial role in the growth of America’s middle class; and

                     Whereas, For decades, collective bargaining, the process by which groups of employees negotiate with management to secure benefits such as health care, safety protections, and pensions, has undergirded the livelihood of millions of American families; and

                     Whereas, Organized labor has a proud tradition in New York City; and

                     Whereas, On September 5th, 1882, the first Labor Day Parade, which featured roughly 10,000 workers, took place in Manhattan; and

                     Whereas, The International Ladies’ Garment Worker Union (ILGWU), a major forerunner of UNITE HERE, was founded in New York City in 1900; and

                     Whereas, Samuel Gompers, the founder of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), started organizing on the Lower East Side; and

                     Whereas, Organized labor remains a major presence in New York City, which is home to 900,000 union members, or 25.5 percent of all city workers, an increase from 21.5 percent in 2012; and

                     Whereas, According to the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center, a similar trend exists statewide, as New York State’s private-sector union density increased from roughly 14 percent in 2012 to 15.1 percent in 2014 ; and

                     Whereas, Moreover, a January 2017 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicates that New York State’s union membership rate of 23.6 percent is not only the nation’s highest but also more than twice the national average of 10.7 percent; and

                     Whereas, Some elected officials have sought to undermine unions across the country in recent years; and

                     Whereas, Twenty-seven states have passed right-to-work (RTW) laws, which release workers from the obligation to pay the fees that fund union representation; and

                     Whereas, In these states, individuals who leave the union can now get a “free ride” by receiving the benefits of collective bargaining without paying for them; and

                     Whereas, Over the last several years, RTW laws have undermined union membership across the country, even in our nation’s industrial heartland; and 

                     Whereas, BLS has found that Wisconsin, which has a long union tradition, has seen union membership plummet since it passed RTW legislation in 2011; and

                     Whereas, BLS found that in 2015, 8.3 percent of Wisconsin workers were union members; and

                     Whereas, That is a sharp decrease from 2014, when 11.7 percent of the state’s workforce belonged to unions; and

                     Whereas, The Center for American Progress (CAP) also found that the decline in union membership correlates with a declining share of total income for the middle 60 percent of households; and

                     Whereas, Although the three middle quintiles earned 53.2 percent of the nation’s income in 1968, they received 45.7 percent of all income in 2012; and

                     Whereas, The political climate remains hostile for organized labor, as President Trump supports RTW laws, and Congress recently introduced legislation to implement them nationwide; and

                     Whereas, Amid this assault on union workers and their families, it is vital that New York City renews its commitment to collective bargaining as an indispensable part of the American social compact; now, therefore, be it

                     Resolved, That the Council of the City of New York affirms the right to collectively bargain for workers in the City of New York

 

 

LS#10238

4/7/17

MK