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Meeting Name: Committee on Civil Service and Labor Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 3/3/2017 10:00 AM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: Council Chambers - City Hall
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
Meeting video:  
Attachments: Attachments - Int. No. 1384, Attachments - Int. No. 1387, Attachments - Int. No. 1388, Attachments - Int. No. 1395, Attachments - Int. No. 1399, Attachmnets - Int. No. 1396
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Int 1384-2016 *Julissa Ferreras-Copeland  Providing fast food employees the ability to make voluntary contributions to not-for-profit organizations of their choice through payroll deductions, and the expiration and repeal of such amendment.IntroductionThis bill would allow fast food employees to designate part of their salary to a not-for-profit of their choosing and require employers to deduct and remit such donation to such not-for-profit.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1384-2016 *Julissa Ferreras-Copeland  Providing fast food employees the ability to make voluntary contributions to not-for-profit organizations of their choice through payroll deductions, and the expiration and repeal of such amendment.IntroductionThis bill would allow fast food employees to designate part of their salary to a not-for-profit of their choosing and require employers to deduct and remit such donation to such not-for-profit.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1387-2016 *Corey D. Johnson  Prohibiting on-call scheduling for retail employees and providing advance notice of work schedules to retail employees.IntroductionThis bill will ban the practice of “on-call scheduling” for retail employees. On-call scheduling is when an employer requires an employee to be available to work, to contact the employer or to wait to be contacted by the employer, to determine whether the employee must report to work. This bill will prohibit retail employers from cancelling, changing or adding work shifts within 72 hours of the start of the shift (except in limited cases). The bill also requires a retail employer to: post the schedule for the retail employees’ schedule 72 hours before the beginning of the scheduled hours of work, to provide (upon request by the a retail employee) a written copy of said employee’s work schedule for any week worked within the prior three years, or to provide (upon request by the a retail employee at the work location) the most current version of the work schedule for all retail employees at the at work location.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1387-2016 *Corey D. Johnson  Prohibiting on-call scheduling for retail employees and providing advance notice of work schedules to retail employees.IntroductionThis bill will ban the practice of “on-call scheduling” for retail employees. On-call scheduling is when an employer requires an employee to be available to work, to contact the employer or to wait to be contacted by the employer, to determine whether the employee must report to work. This bill will prohibit retail employers from cancelling, changing or adding work shifts within 72 hours of the start of the shift (except in limited cases). The bill also requires a retail employer to: post the schedule for the retail employees’ schedule 72 hours before the beginning of the scheduled hours of work, to provide (upon request by the a retail employee) a written copy of said employee’s work schedule for any week worked within the prior three years, or to provide (upon request by the a retail employee at the work location) the most current version of the work schedule for all retail employees at the at work location.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1388-2016 *Corey D. Johnson  Banning consecutive work shifts in fast food restaurants involving both the closing and opening of the restaurant.IntroductionThis bill would ban “clopenings” for fast food employees; fast food employers would not be allowed to require fast food workers to work back-to-back shifts when the first shift closes the establishment and the second shift opens it the next day, with fewer than 11 hours in between. The employer will need to pay pay an employee who works a “clopening” shift $100 for each instance that such employee works such shifts.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1388-2016 *Corey D. Johnson  Banning consecutive work shifts in fast food restaurants involving both the closing and opening of the restaurant.IntroductionThis bill would ban “clopenings” for fast food employees; fast food employers would not be allowed to require fast food workers to work back-to-back shifts when the first shift closes the establishment and the second shift opens it the next day, with fewer than 11 hours in between. The employer will need to pay pay an employee who works a “clopening” shift $100 for each instance that such employee works such shifts.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1395-2016 *Brad S. Lander  Requiring fast food employers to offer work shifts to current employees before hiring additional employees.IntroductionThis bill would require fast food employers with available hours to offer shifts to existing employees before hiring new employees. This bill is intended to provide part-time fast food workers with a path toward additional hours and full-time employment, should they want it. Employers would only be required to offer hours to current employees up until the point at which the employer would be required to pay overtime, or until all current employees have rejected available hours, whichever comes first. Only after the employer had exhausted options to provide shifts to current workers would the fast food employers be free to hire additional part-time workers. This bill is part of a package of bills aimed at improving working conditions related to employee work schedules.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1395-2016 *Brad S. Lander  Requiring fast food employers to offer work shifts to current employees before hiring additional employees.IntroductionThis bill would require fast food employers with available hours to offer shifts to existing employees before hiring new employees. This bill is intended to provide part-time fast food workers with a path toward additional hours and full-time employment, should they want it. Employers would only be required to offer hours to current employees up until the point at which the employer would be required to pay overtime, or until all current employees have rejected available hours, whichever comes first. Only after the employer had exhausted options to provide shifts to current workers would the fast food employers be free to hire additional part-time workers. This bill is part of a package of bills aimed at improving working conditions related to employee work schedules.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1396-2016 *Brad S. Lander  Establishing general provisions governing fair work practices and requiring certain fast food employers to provide advance notice of work schedules to employees and to provide a schedule change premium when hours are changed after required notices.IntroductionThis bill will make the schedules of fast food employees more predictable. It will create general provisions for a fair work week chapter of the Administrative Code and will require certain fast food employers to provide employees with an estimate of their work schedule upon hire and a work schedule 14 days in advance (including all shifts). This bill will require a premium to be paid to employees for schedule changes made by the employer with less than 14 days’ notice to the employee (a greater schedule change premium is as the start of the first shift nears). Changes to schedules will will canceling, shortening, or moving shifts, adding additional hours to scheduled shifts, and adding shifts. This bill is part of a package of bills aimed at improving working conditions related to employee work schedules. The bill also renumbers, without substantive change, provisions on shipboard gambling to make room for new provisions administered by the Department of Consumer Affairs.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1396-2016 *Brad S. Lander  Establishing general provisions governing fair work practices and requiring certain fast food employers to provide advance notice of work schedules to employees and to provide a schedule change premium when hours are changed after required notices.IntroductionThis bill will make the schedules of fast food employees more predictable. It will create general provisions for a fair work week chapter of the Administrative Code and will require certain fast food employers to provide employees with an estimate of their work schedule upon hire and a work schedule 14 days in advance (including all shifts). This bill will require a premium to be paid to employees for schedule changes made by the employer with less than 14 days’ notice to the employee (a greater schedule change premium is as the start of the first shift nears). Changes to schedules will will canceling, shortening, or moving shifts, adding additional hours to scheduled shifts, and adding shifts. This bill is part of a package of bills aimed at improving working conditions related to employee work schedules. The bill also renumbers, without substantive change, provisions on shipboard gambling to make room for new provisions administered by the Department of Consumer Affairs.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1399-2016 *Deborah L. Rose  Protecting employees who seek temporary changes to work schedules for personal events and certain other schedule changes.IntroductionThe bill would require an employer to allow employees to take two temporary schedule changes per calendar year—including paid time off, remote work, changing work hours and unpaid leave—relating to a caregiving emergency, a legal proceeding or hearing for subsistence benefits, or any circumstance that would constitute a basis for permissible use of safe time or sick time under chapter 8 of title 20 of the administration code. The bill would also establish a written process for employees and employers to communicate regarding requests for such changes. This bill would also protect employees from employers retaliating against them for making schedule change requests, because section 20-1204’s prohibition on retaliation would apply. This bill would not affect leave granted under the city’s earned sick and safe time act or apply to employees under certain collective bargaining agreements or to certain employees in the entertainment industry.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 1399-2016 *Deborah L. Rose  Protecting employees who seek temporary changes to work schedules for personal events and certain other schedule changes.IntroductionThe bill would require an employer to allow employees to take two temporary schedule changes per calendar year—including paid time off, remote work, changing work hours and unpaid leave—relating to a caregiving emergency, a legal proceeding or hearing for subsistence benefits, or any circumstance that would constitute a basis for permissible use of safe time or sick time under chapter 8 of title 20 of the administration code. The bill would also establish a written process for employees and employers to communicate regarding requests for such changes. This bill would also protect employees from employers retaliating against them for making schedule change requests, because section 20-1204’s prohibition on retaliation would apply. This bill would not affect leave granted under the city’s earned sick and safe time act or apply to employees under certain collective bargaining agreements or to certain employees in the entertainment industry.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available