Meeting Name: Committee on Civil Rights Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 9/21/2015 1:00 PM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: Committee Room - City Hall
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
Meeting video:  
Attachments: Attachments - Int. No. 108-A, Attachments - Int. No. 804-A, Attachments - Int. No. 815-A, Attachments - Int. No. 825-A
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Int 0108-2014 *Deborah L. RoseProposed Int. No. 108-AProhibiting employment discrimination based on an individual’s actual or perceived status as a caregiver.IntroductionMany employees throughout New York City, as well the nation, have caregiving and familial responsibilities that include assisting with the care of children, parents, spouses, and other family members. Under section 8-101 of the New York City Human Rights Law, there are a number of protected classes defined, including, but not limited to, “gender,” “sexual orientation,” “partnership status,” “national origin,” “disability,” and “alienage or citizenship status.” These protected classes are covered under Section 8-107 of the Law, which prohibits employment discrimination. This bill would include “caregiver” as a protected class; prohibiting employers from discriminating based on one’s status, or perceived status, as a “caregiver.”Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0108-2014 *Deborah L. Rose Prohibiting employment discrimination based on an individual’s actual or perceived status as a caregiver.IntroductionMany employees throughout New York City, as well the nation, have caregiving and familial responsibilities that include assisting with the care of children, parents, spouses, and other family members. Under section 8-101 of the New York City Human Rights Law, there are a number of protected classes defined, including, but not limited to, “gender,” “sexual orientation,” “partnership status,” “national origin,” “disability,” and “alienage or citizenship status.” These protected classes are covered under Section 8-107 of the Law, which prohibits employment discrimination. This bill would include “caregiver” as a protected class; prohibiting employers from discriminating based on one’s status, or perceived status, as a “caregiver.”Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0108-2014 *Deborah L. Rose Prohibiting employment discrimination based on an individual’s actual or perceived status as a caregiver.IntroductionMany employees throughout New York City, as well the nation, have caregiving and familial responsibilities that include assisting with the care of children, parents, spouses, and other family members. Under section 8-101 of the New York City Human Rights Law, there are a number of protected classes defined, including, but not limited to, “gender,” “sexual orientation,” “partnership status,” “national origin,” “disability,” and “alienage or citizenship status.” These protected classes are covered under Section 8-107 of the Law, which prohibits employment discrimination. This bill would include “caregiver” as a protected class; prohibiting employers from discriminating based on one’s status, or perceived status, as a “caregiver.”Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0804-2015 *Inez D. BarronProposed Int. No. 804-AReasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilitiesIntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law currently requires the entities that it covers to make reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities, but does not require accommodations that would impose an “undue hardship” on the business. This bill clarifies the reasonable accommodation requirement by expressly requiring employers and potential employers to engage in a good faith interactive discussion with employees or applicants who have disabilities (including pregnancy and related conditions), in order to identify what reasonable accommodations are available to allow that person to perform the job in question.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0804-2015 *Inez D. Barron Reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilitiesIntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law currently requires the entities that it covers to make reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities, but does not require accommodations that would impose an “undue hardship” on the business. This bill clarifies the reasonable accommodation requirement by expressly requiring employers and potential employers to engage in a good faith interactive discussion with employees or applicants who have disabilities (including pregnancy and related conditions), in order to identify what reasonable accommodations are available to allow that person to perform the job in question.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0804-2015 *Inez D. Barron Reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilitiesIntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law currently requires the entities that it covers to make reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities, but does not require accommodations that would impose an “undue hardship” on the business. This bill clarifies the reasonable accommodation requirement by expressly requiring employers and potential employers to engage in a good faith interactive discussion with employees or applicants who have disabilities (including pregnancy and related conditions), in order to identify what reasonable accommodations are available to allow that person to perform the job in question.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0815-2015 *Brad S. LanderProposed Int. No. 815-AProtecting the right to truthful information under the city human rights law and expressly providing a cause of action for employers and principals whose rights are violated by conduct to which their employees or agents are subjected.IntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law (“HRL”) bars real estate brokers and salespeople from lying about the availability of housing, land, or commercial space for a discriminatory reason, a protection sometimes called a “right to truthful information.” This bill would broaden or incorporate a right to truthful information for a variety of activity covered by the HRL, including: the availability and terms and conditions of sale or lease for housing, land, or commercial space; admission to or membership in a Multiple Listing Service or similar organizations; lending; employment; and access to public accommodations, which include many providers of goods and services, including restaurants, stores, and even some government entities. This bill would also give principals and employers a cause of action when their rights are violated by discrimination against their agents or employees, as long as the discrimination happened while the agent or employee was working for the principal or employer.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0815-2015 *Brad S. Lander Protecting the right to truthful information under the city human rights law and expressly providing a cause of action for employers and principals whose rights are violated by conduct to which their employees or agents are subjected.IntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law (“HRL”) bars real estate brokers and salespeople from lying about the availability of housing, land, or commercial space for a discriminatory reason, a protection sometimes called a “right to truthful information.” This bill would broaden or incorporate a right to truthful information for a variety of activity covered by the HRL, including: the availability and terms and conditions of sale or lease for housing, land, or commercial space; admission to or membership in a Multiple Listing Service or similar organizations; lending; employment; and access to public accommodations, which include many providers of goods and services, including restaurants, stores, and even some government entities. This bill would also give principals and employers a cause of action when their rights are violated by discrimination against their agents or employees, as long as the discrimination happened while the agent or employee was working for the principal or employer.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0815-2015 *Brad S. Lander Protecting the right to truthful information under the city human rights law and expressly providing a cause of action for employers and principals whose rights are violated by conduct to which their employees or agents are subjected.IntroductionThe New York City Human Rights Law (“HRL”) bars real estate brokers and salespeople from lying about the availability of housing, land, or commercial space for a discriminatory reason, a protection sometimes called a “right to truthful information.” This bill would broaden or incorporate a right to truthful information for a variety of activity covered by the HRL, including: the availability and terms and conditions of sale or lease for housing, land, or commercial space; admission to or membership in a Multiple Listing Service or similar organizations; lending; employment; and access to public accommodations, which include many providers of goods and services, including restaurants, stores, and even some government entities. This bill would also give principals and employers a cause of action when their rights are violated by discrimination against their agents or employees, as long as the discrimination happened while the agent or employee was working for the principal or employer.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0825-2015 *Deborah L. RoseProposed Int. No. 825-AExpanding the definition of employer under the human rights law to provide protections for domestic workers.IntroductionTitle 8 of the New York City Administrative Code prohibits various forms of discrimination in employment and protects a number of classes of people. Currently, employees of employers with fewer than four employees total are not protected by the prohibitions against discrimination in employment, apprentice training programs, religious observance in the employment context, unemployment status, disparate impact discrimination in the employment context, and unlawful discrimination against victims of domestic violence, sex offenses or stalking. Also, employees of employers with fewer than four employees total are not protected by the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. This bill would change the definition of employer to provide these protections for domestic workers.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0825-2015 *Deborah L. Rose Expanding the definition of employer under the human rights law to provide protections for domestic workers.IntroductionTitle 8 of the New York City Administrative Code prohibits various forms of discrimination in employment and protects a number of classes of people. Currently, employees of employers with fewer than four employees total are not protected by the prohibitions against discrimination in employment, apprentice training programs, religious observance in the employment context, unemployment status, disparate impact discrimination in the employment context, and unlawful discrimination against victims of domestic violence, sex offenses or stalking. Also, employees of employers with fewer than four employees total are not protected by the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. This bill would change the definition of employer to provide these protections for domestic workers.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0825-2015 *Deborah L. Rose Expanding the definition of employer under the human rights law to provide protections for domestic workers.IntroductionTitle 8 of the New York City Administrative Code prohibits various forms of discrimination in employment and protects a number of classes of people. Currently, employees of employers with fewer than four employees total are not protected by the prohibitions against discrimination in employment, apprentice training programs, religious observance in the employment context, unemployment status, disparate impact discrimination in the employment context, and unlawful discrimination against victims of domestic violence, sex offenses or stalking. Also, employees of employers with fewer than four employees total are not protected by the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. This bill would change the definition of employer to provide these protections for domestic workers.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available