Meeting Name: Committee on Transportation Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 10/29/2014 1:00 PM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: Council Chambers - City Hall
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
Meeting video:  
Attachments: Attachments - Int. No. 216-A, Attachments - Int. No. 383, Summary of Int. No. 216-A
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Int 0216-2014 *Mark LevineProposed Int. No. 216-AIncreasing the number of accessible pedestrian signals.IntroductionAn accessible pedestrian signal (“APS”) is a device that communicates information about pedestrian timing in nonvisual format such as audible tones, verbal messages, and vibrating surfaces. APS generally provide information to pedestrians about the existence and location of the pushbutton, the beginning of the “WALK” interval, the direction of the crosswalk, and location of the destination curb. In 2012, the Council enacted a local law requiring the New York City Department of Transportation (“DOT”) to establish an APS program and annually install accessible pedestrian signals at each corner of 25 identified intersections. The bill would increase the minimum number of intersections at which DOT must install an APS to 75.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0216-2014 *Mark Levine Increasing the number of accessible pedestrian signals.IntroductionAn accessible pedestrian signal (“APS”) is a device that communicates information about pedestrian timing in nonvisual format such as audible tones, verbal messages, and vibrating surfaces. APS generally provide information to pedestrians about the existence and location of the pushbutton, the beginning of the “WALK” interval, the direction of the crosswalk, and location of the destination curb. In 2012, the Council enacted a local law requiring the New York City Department of Transportation (“DOT”) to establish an APS program and annually install accessible pedestrian signals at each corner of 25 identified intersections. The bill would increase the minimum number of intersections at which DOT must install an APS to 75.Amendment Proposed by Comm  Action details Not available
Int 0216-2014 *Mark Levine Increasing the number of accessible pedestrian signals.IntroductionAn accessible pedestrian signal (“APS”) is a device that communicates information about pedestrian timing in nonvisual format such as audible tones, verbal messages, and vibrating surfaces. APS generally provide information to pedestrians about the existence and location of the pushbutton, the beginning of the “WALK” interval, the direction of the crosswalk, and location of the destination curb. In 2012, the Council enacted a local law requiring the New York City Department of Transportation (“DOT”) to establish an APS program and annually install accessible pedestrian signals at each corner of 25 identified intersections. The bill would increase the minimum number of intersections at which DOT must install an APS to 75.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0383-2014 *Ydanis A. Rodriguez "Rounding up” parking time.IntroductionUnder the bill, the City would require a person purchasing time at a muni-meter to pay only up to the last full unit of time before the end of the paid parking period, thus preventing a person from having to pay beyond the mandatory paid parking time.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0383-2014 *Ydanis A. Rodriguez "Rounding up” parking time.IntroductionUnder the bill, the City would require a person purchasing time at a muni-meter to pay only up to the last full unit of time before the end of the paid parking period, thus preventing a person from having to pay beyond the mandatory paid parking time.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available