New York City Council Header
File #: Res 0375-2014    Version: * Name: DOE to include lessons on climate change in K-12 schools’ curriculum.
Type: Resolution Status: Adopted
Committee: Committee on Education
On agenda: 8/21/2014
Enactment date: Law number:
Title: Resolution calling upon New York State Department of Education to include lessons on climate change in K-12 schools' curriculum.
Sponsors: Costa G. Constantinides, Donovan J. Richards, Inez D. Barron, Margaret S. Chin, Mathieu Eugene, Corey D. Johnson, Stephen T. Levin, Rosie Mendez, Andrew Cohen, Ydanis A. Rodriguez, Helen K. Rosenthal, Fernando Cabrera , Ben Kallos, Darlene Mealy, I. Daneek Miller, Deborah L. Rose, Mark Treyger, James G. Van Bramer, Annabel Palma, Rafael L. Espinal, Jr., Carlos Menchaca, Jumaane D. Williams, Daniel R. Garodnick, Ritchie J. Torres, Brad S. Lander, Vincent J. Gentile, Alan N. Maisel, Mark Levine, Antonio Reynoso
Council Member Sponsors: 29
Attachments: 1. Committee Report 4/19/16, 2. Hearing Testimony 4/19/16, 3. Hearing Transcript 4/19/16, 4. April 20, 2016 - Stated Meeting Agenda with Links to Files, 5. Hearing Transcript - Stated Meeting 4-20-16, 6. Minutes of the Stated Meeting - April 20, 2016
Date Ver.Prime SponsorAction ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsMultimedia
4/20/2016*Costa G. Constantinides City Council Approved, by CouncilPass Action details Meeting details Not available
4/19/2016*Costa G. Constantinides Committee on Education Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Meeting details Not available
4/19/2016*Costa G. Constantinides Committee on Education Approved by CommitteePass Action details Meeting details Not available
8/21/2014*Costa G. Constantinides City Council Referred to Comm by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available
8/21/2014*Costa G. Constantinides City Council Introduced by Council  Action details Meeting details Not available

Res. No. 375

 

Resolution calling upon New York State Department of Education to include lessons on climate change in K-12 schools’ curriculum.

 

By Council Members Constantinides, Richards, Barron, Chin, Eugene, Johnson, Levin, Mendez, Cohen, Rodriguez, Rosenthal, Cabrera, Kallos, Mealy, Miller, Rose, Treyger, Van Bramer, Palma, Espinal, Menchaca, Williams, Garodnick, Torres, Lander, Gentile, Maisel, Levine and Reynoso

 

                     Whereas, According to the National Center for Science Education (NCSE), “it is important for the science of climate change to be taught, both in formal and informal educational environments, in order for future citizens to be able to make scientifically informed decisions about the consequences of climate change;” and

                     Whereas, According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),  climate change includes major changes in temperature, precipitation, or wind patterns, among other effects, that occur over several decades or longer; and 

Whereas, The EPA states that the magnitude of future climate change will depend on many factors including the rate at which levels of greenhouse gas concentrations in our atmosphere continue to increase, how strongly features of the climate respond to the expected increase in greenhouse gas concentrations, and  natural influences on and natural processes within the climate system; and

Whereas, While climate change is a scientifically based phenomenon, its effects can impact agriculture, infrastructure, economies, national security, and international relations; and

 Whereas, In an August 1, 2014 memo to her colleagues, Senator Patty Murray,  Chair of the Senate Budget Committee, states that climate change will have serious ramifications for the United States economy and the federal budget and failure to confront it will make it harder to meet our county’s long-term fiscal challenges; and

Whereas, In 2013, a consortium of 26 state governments and several groups representing scientists and teachers developed new guidelines that call for sweeping changes in the way science is taught in the United States, including, for the first time, a recommendation that climate change be taught as early as middle school; and

Whereas, Currently, thirteen states have officially adopted these guidelines but New York State is not one of them; and

Whereas, The New York State Education Department (NYSED) is responsible for setting  student learning standards for what all students should know and be able to do as a result of skilled instruction; and

Whereas, It is important that today’s students are equipped with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to navigate in a changing world; and

Whereas, While climate change science should be included in science curriculum, it is also important to introduce a knowledge of its far reaching impacts to other areas impacted; and

Whereas, On June 10, 2014, students from high schools throughout New York City  rallied on the steps of City Hall to call for comprehensive climate change education as a basic tenet of the curriculum; and

Whereas, Superstorm Sandy severely affected the New York City area forever changing its landscape and its people; and

Whereas, Many believe climate change will increase such storms and New York City’s students need to be educated about these issues; now, therefore, be it

                     Resolved, That the Council of the City of New York calls upon New York State Department of Education to include lessons on climate change in K-12 schools’ curriculum.

 

 

LS 1929

8/1/14

JP